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CRC for Forestry News issue one: print version

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Issue one - December 2007 e-newsletter
CRC for Forestry News - science for sustainable forest landscapes

Christmas greetings from the CRC for Forestry

Wishing you a happy and relaxing Christmas following an eventful and exciting year for the CRC and our partners. Welcome to the December 2007 issue of CRC for Forestry News, by CEO Professor Gordon Duff...

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Harvest planning workshops a big success

WA harvest planning workshop group3 In its first major series of hands-on and face-to-face activities since Programme Leader Mark Brown joined the team, the Harvesting and Operations Programme and guest international instructors have just concluded a successful series of practical workshops in Tasmania, Western Australia and South Australia

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Research news

Read the latest research news from the four programmes of the CRC for Forestry, including updates on scientific progress, member profiles, people, news and current events...

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Communications strategy, new website and report library

The CRC for Forestry's new website is designed to be easier to navigate, more engaging and fully searchable, and includes a comprehensive library of technical reports. The communications strategy is online and open for comment

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New National Forestry Masters Programme

CRC industry partners and others wishing to upskill will have the opportunity to study forestry by coursework in 2008 with the new National Forestry Masters Programme… 

[read more]

Old Forests New Management conference

“Old Forests, New Management” is an international scientific conference about the conservation and use of old-growth forests in the 21st century, co-hosted by the CRC for Forestry and contributing to the Biodiversity Project. 161 abstracts and papers have been submitted so far covering the six themes of the conference…

[read more]

Christmas gift idea

eucaflipThe CRC and the University of Tasmania have published an all-weather Tasmanian eucalypt field identification kit for bushwalkers.

With copies distributed as part of an education kit for students to at least 65 high schools, district schools and colleges, it has been so popular that the map-sized reference is now in its second print run.

Copies are available for the recommended retail price of $9.95 from the Tasmanian Map Centre, Dismal Swamp, Mt Field National Park Visitor Centre, Freycinet National Park and the Queen Victoria Museum, or contact the School of Plant Science, University of Tasmania.

Read the press release.

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Christmas wishes 2007

Gordon_largeWelcome to the December 2007 edition of CRC for Forestry News, the first edition in this new format. With the Christmas break just around the corner, many of you, like me, may be wondering what happened to 2007. Looking back, it’s been an eventful and exciting year for the CRC and our partners, a year that has seen some significant milestones in our development as an organisation.

The year has also seen some big changes to our operating environment; the political scenery in Australia has altered, and a number of new federal ministers have moved into our orbit. Climate change and carbon trading loom larger in the landscape, and the impact of a decade or more of low rainfall across much of the continent continues to grow in significance. These changes all serve to highlight the importance of the work we are doing, and reinforce many of the strategic directions we’ve chosen.

On a different front, the CRC Programme itself will have a new departmental home in 2008, and the goalposts are likely to shift back to more of a focus on national benefit.  The CRC Programme Review is likely to be brought forward, but all signs are that the programme has a positive future. 

Updates on programme activities in this newsletter highlight some of the exciting work that is emerging across all research programmes. Particularly during the latter part of the year, workshops involving significant numbers of industry and other end-user participants have helped to ensure that our research outputs are hitting the mark. Some of these events are described in the following pages.

Some new faces have joined the lineup, including Mark Brown who now leads our Harvesting and Operations Programme, and Tom Fisk, our Industry Engagement Manager. As this newsletter goes online, we will be finalising the appointment of a new Business Manager – more on that in the new year.  Two new PCC chairs, Justine Edwards and Trevor Innes, have been helping set the strategic directions for Programmes One and Two, while our visiting forest engineering professor, Loren Kellogg, has played an important role in guiding the long awaited establishment of Programme Three.

On the down side, our long standing CRC Visitor, Dr Max Whitten, has regretfully resigned from that role. CRC Visitors are important and influential contacts and mentors for CRCs and Max has given CRCs for forestry the benefit of his wisdom and experience since 2000, both as Visitor and Chair of our Research Advisory Panel. We have been privileged to have a scientist of Max’s calibre associated with the CRC, and his influence will be missed.

We have a new website! Communications Manager Taylor Bildstein and others continue to load material onto the CRCs public website www.crcforestry.com.au, and I would urge everyone to log on and have a look around. Ultimately all of the CRC’s web based information will be migrated to the new site, although some of it will remain password protected and accessible to CRC members only. The public and members areas contain a wealth of valuable information, from the early days of the CRC for Temperate Hardwood Forestry through to some up-to-the-minute research findings.

Early 2008 will be off to a flying start with the Old Forests New Management conference in Hobart, starting 17 February. This is a high-profile, international conference supported by the Australian Academies of Science, Engineering and Technology. Having such a conference associated with the CRC and our partners is acknolwedgement of the significance and international standing of our science and scientists. More information on the conference can be found at www.oldforests.org.au

Timing for the 2008 (09?) CRC Annual Science Meeting is still up in the air, and we are waiting on the Commonwealth for information about the timing and format of our third year review. The punters among you would get short odds on mid-late October in Hobart, and I hope to confirm early in the new year. Again, watch this space.

Finally, I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all members of our community for your contribution to our shared endeavors during 2007, and wish you and your families a peaceful and joyous Christmas and a safe and prosperous new year.

Professor Gordon Duff, CEO.

Contacts

Professor Gordon Duff
Chief Executive Officer
CRC for Forestry
Tel: +61 3 6226 7947

Fax: +61 3 6226 7942

Private Bag 12
Hobart, Tasmania 7001 Australia


Harvest planning workshops a big success


In its first major series of hands-on and face-to-face activities since Programme Leader Mark Brown joined the team, the Harvesting and Operations Programme and guest international instructors have just concluded a successful series of practical workshops in Tasmania, Western Australia and South Australia.

Internationally recognised instructors from Oregon State University, USA, led 90 participants through harvest planning for the Australian forest industry, from the impacts of establishment planning through to scheduling of operations.

Lead instructor Professor John Sessions visited Australia exclusively for the workshops, bringing international experience in forest harvesting systems, harvesting and transport planning, and the development of analytical tools and software to assist forest harvesting operations management.

Co-instructor Professor Loren Kellogg is six months into a one-year secondment with the CRC for Forestry and the University of Melbourne, bringing a unique blend of practical forest operations experience and technical forest engineering skills, with international experience in forest harvesting systems.

Loren was also lead instructor for a cable logging workshop that was offered in Tasmania only.

The workshops demonstrated:

  • Technical tools and analytical methods for eucalyptus and pine plantation establishment; and for harvest planning of plantation and native forests.
  • Harvest planning software and discussion of practical applications.
  • Applications of workshop concepts to forest management decisions and problem solving, such as plantation establishment, resource protection and harvesting management.

Real local operational questions were addressed and worked through, resulting in outcomes that everyone could easily relate to and translate to their daily work, including helping a contractor develop a solution to a maintenance scheduling problem; a future study location for thinning productivity and biomass recovery and transport; and participant interest to take on a postgraduate project.

The workshops also represented an opportunity for industry participants – ranging from plantation establishment foresters, plantation harvesting planners, regrowth thinning planners, native forest harvesting planners and logging supervisors and contractors - to interact together. This resulted in some useful discussions and contact building that will no doubt be called upon in future to assist the industry to be more effective and efficient. 

As for all Programme Three activities, these workshops only succeed with the full support and engagement of our industrial partners.  We would like to thank our partners for their support for these workshops and for supporting their staff to attend and actively participate.  We look forward to further strengthening the relationships established in these workshops in future with field study and other technology transfer activities.


Download handouts and notes from the harvest planning workshops in the event section.

Contacts

Professor Mark Brown
CRC for Forestry


Communications strategy, new website and report library

The CRC for Forestry has a new website! The new site is designed to be easier to navigate, more engaging and fully searchable.

The new basic site went live in November and continues to be developed. Illustrated newsletters can now be sent from the website directly to your inbox, giving you the ability quickly to see what’s new, and click through to the items of most interest to you. Programme newsletter can also be accessed at an online archive.

New sections include pages on governance, people and the goals of the CRC for Forestry. Milestones from the CRC's contract with the Australian Government  are available for download, and there's a recent publications section.

Development for early 2008 will include user profiles, staff profiles and major field sites, an intranet integrated with the rest of the site, content migration, decommissioning the old members’ website and RSS feeds.

Twenty three public technical reports dating back to 1998, have been made available for free download.

These public reports from the CRC for Forestry and the CRC for Sustainable Production Forestry cover topics such as alternative management for browsing mammals, harvesting and haulage, conservation planting, eucalypt genetics, herbicide tolerance, fertiliser management, process-based models, stress physiology and measuring growth stress, tree decline, revegetation and farm forestry.

On the new website you’ll also find the latest scholarship information, plus profiles of our students and their research; links through to our 29 partners; information about our research programmes, key people… and more. So please have a look around and then let us know what you think.

Until the intranet is developed, all information at www.crcforestry.com.au is available to the public. Non-public documents can still be accessed via the members’ website, which will remain live for the time being.

The new website and improved access to the technical report library are important components of the 2008 Communications Strategy, which was recently endorsed by the Communications Committee and can now accessed online (see link below). Your feedback on this approach is very welcome.

New National Forestry Masters Programme

CRC industry partners and others wishing to upskill will have the opportunity to study forestry by coursework in 2008 with the new National Forestry Masters Programme.

The CRC for Forestry is partner to this Commonwealth-funded initiative, which addresses the shortage of graduates in the industry.

Despite research showing that graduating foresters are happiest with their programmes among all fields of study, and that annual starting salaries for forestry jobs in country areas are higher on average than those in urban areas, foresters remain in short supply (view source).

The new National Forestry Masters Programme addresses this shortage with two-week intensive coursework units at each of the partner universities; courses can be taken individually, or in series to make up a masters degree.

Each university – Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Tasmania, Southern Cross University and the University of Queensland – offers specialist courses, some of which will be taught for the first time by CRC members.

Scholarships of up to $3,500 are available to enable students to travel to study the courses that most interest them. In this way, the new programme is a truly national scheme. The Programme will also offer at least one offshore course each year, to enable Australian participants to connect directly with key people and issues in the Asia-Pacific region.

Students in the first course offered by the National Forestry Masters Programme will participate in the Old Forests New Management conference in February 2008, an international scientific conference on the conservation and use of old-growth forests in the 21st century that is co-hosted by the CRC for Forestry.

For more information about the new National Forestry Masters Programme see http://www.forestry.org.au/masters/

Old Forests New Management conference

“Old Forests, New Management” is an international scientific conference about the conservation and use of old-growth forests in the 21st century, co-hosted by the CRC for Forestry and contributing to the Biodiversity Project, to be held in Hobart 17-21 February 2008.

161 abstracts and papers have been submitted so far covering the six themes of the conference:

1: Social and historical importance of old-growth forests

2: Biology of old-growth forests

3: Long-term, multidisciplinary experiments

4: Conservation and reserve management

5: Toward ecological silviculture

6: Shaping old-growth forest management regimes

The full provisional programme features international experts from Europe, South America, the Pacific Northwest, Alaska and Australia

Registrations remain open at http://www.oldforests.com.au